Wednesday, 11 June 2008

From beyond the freezer

Listening to: Seldom Seen Kid (Elbow)
Today's recipe: pig's liver pate
Weather: Dull, overcast
Next project: dig out kitchen floor, lay a damp-proof membrane and slabs on top
How: hard can that be?

I finally plucked up courage to go over to what was Eric and Ernie's paddock yesterday. It was eerily quiet.

I assessed the damage to their hut and dug out all the old bedding straw, the aim being to get the place ready for when the sows move out there in a few weeks.

You'll be pleased to know that the lads had one last jape prepared for the unsuspecting sort-of pig farmer. Under one layer of straw outside the hut was the spot where their water tub had been.

I'd forgotten that regular spillages had left the going a little more than heavy and inevitably put one size nine foot down only for - in finest cartoon style - the world to turn upside down with me ending up on my hands and knees, realising that it wasn't just water that had been spilled there. Still, it'll be a great spot to plant potatoes in a year or so.

Very funny, boys.

13 comments:

Jessica at Bwlchyrhyd said...

I'm curious to see how your kitchen floor project gets on as that's on my list of things to do as well... :)

andrea said...

Excellent parting gift. I think you need to fill that void with E & E II. Better yet, you should simply call all your future porcine pals Eric...

PS In spite of the fact that I might look like a total moron, what's the difference between a pig and a hog?

fiwa said...

LOL! They wanted to leave you something to remember them by!

ziggi said...

good for the skin I hear - you'll be all soft and smooth.

Slabs are heavy - that's all I know about slabs, hope it helps.

Brad said...

When life hands you pig poop, turn them into tomatoes. Great attitude.

Inwardly Confused said...

Ah the old farmer in the tub trick, a classic.

susi said...

Andrea,

In Britain, a hog is a castrated male pig being raised for meat. A pig is any pig. I'm not sure about the American terminology, I think they may use both "hog" and "pig" for any pig. I suppose, in that case, piglets would be hoglets (not to be confused with hoggets which are sheep).
Hope this helps...

Ginni Dee said...

Here in America a hog is a huge motorcycle and a pig is any girl who is prettier than yourself!

Actually the meanings are the same as you just said Susi. A hog is to be butchered and a pig is the generic term for the species.

By all means, Malc, don't let that lovely pig manure go to waste. By next year it should be nicely composted and would grow some wonderful veggies!

Dave said...

Perhaps you could bag it up and post it to all your gardening readers.

fathorse said...

heehee, the cads :)

I saw this and thought of you malc:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/north_yorkshire/7448006.stm

I think I spot a gap in the market...

Rol said...

Isn't that Elbow album fantastic?

Richard said...

Rol, yes it is. It's an absolutely marvellous album. That barely audible little guitar figure at the end of One Day Like This has me almost weeping, it's so joyful. In the time honoured manner, if you buy just one album this year...

andrea said...

Susi: Thanks and that makes a lot of sense. I'm up-to-the-minute on my bull/steer and stallion (or horse)/gelding terminology so you just broadened my horizons (and gave me a grin when I realised the Farmer Hogget connection in Babe).